DMin Upcoming Classes

Winter 2019

Charlotte

January 7 – 11, 2019

Scripture, Authority & Origins of the NT Canon
Dr. Michael Kruger

03DM876 – Charlotte
SyllabusRegistration opens November 1

In as much as Scripture continues to be attacked in our modern world, those in ministry still need the tools to explain and defend it.  This course explores the issue of biblical authority through the lens of the formation of the New Testament canon.  Attention will be given to theological foundations of Scripture, the history of the canon, key figures in 2nd and 3rd centuries, and modern scholarly trends.


January 14 – 18, 2019
The Life and Theology of Jonathan Edwards
Dr. David Filson
03DM860 – Charlotte
SyllabusRegistration opens November 1

This course is a survey of the life and thought of “America’s Augustine,” as he has been called, with special focus upon Edwards’ context and writings.


January 17 – 20, 2019
Church Revitalization
Dr. Harry Reeder
03DM819 – Charlotte
SyllabusRegistration opens November 1

This course will address the contemporary church profile and the pressing need of church revitalization in North America, by seeking to acquaint the students with specific quality literature, dealing with the issues of church renewal and revitalization. We will determine Biblical models and theological principles applicable to church revitalization, and identify those factors with bring stagnation and decline to the local church, with a goal to develop a plan to initiate church revitalization in the student’s ministry that is faithful to the Scripture, relevant specific situation and clearly prioritized for practical application.


January 30, 2019 – July 15, 2019 – Online course (Prerequisite: Must have completed 7 courses)
Doctoral Project and Research Methodologies
Dr. S. Donald Fortson

03DM901 – Charlotte and Orlando
SyllabusRegistration opens November 1

This online course will assist the student to understand the required components of the DMin Project and to prepare an acceptable Project Proposal.  As an outcome of the course, students will write the first draft of a Project Proposal with bibliography and be prepared to submit this draft to the DMin committee on their home campus – Charlotte or Orlando.

 

 

Orlando

January 7 – 11, 2019
Preaching from the Pentateuch
Dr. John Currid
02DM886/01 – Orlando
SyllabusRegistration opens November 1

Preaching the Pentateuch is often neglected by the church. The reasons for this neglect are complex and complicated. Part of the problem, of course, is the church’s difficulty in seeing the application of OT narrative texts that appear to be so strange and esoteric. Indeed, how do such passages as the leprosy laws and the food laws apply to the church of Jesus Christ? How do pastors make such teachings meaningful and relevant to their congregations? Another aspect of the problem is that for almost two hundred years OT scholarship has focused on issues of criticism, that is, questions of dating and authorship. Skepticism regarding the reliability and authority of the OT dominate the field of study. As Ralph Davis has pointed out, these scholars have “managed to make Old Testament studies mostly boring, lifeless, and dull.” In addition, many pastors seem to center their preaching ministry in the NT in which they feel they are really getting at the heart of the Christian message. In this way, OT narrative is almost shunned and put to the side as not as relevant as the NT. Finally, one of the greatest parts of the problem is the reality that many pastors simply do not know how to preach the OT. Often there is simply moralizing (e.g., who is the Goliath in your life?) or spring-boarding (using the text to jump into some theological point that can be generally applied). Thus, in the church today there seems to be a general malaise or stupor when it comes to preaching the OT. In 2 Timothy 3:16-17, the Apostle Paul makes the following statement: “All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be competent, equipped for every good work.” Paul, of course, is here speaking of the OT scriptures, and he sees the vital and crucial part that they are to play in the life of the Christian and the church. We need to take this to heart. The OT is part of God’s holy, inerrant, authoritative word. In this course, we will focus on the means and methods of preaching texts from the Pentateuch. These texts can be most challenging and difficult to interpret and to preach, but it can also provide wonderful, in-depth teaching and theology when appropriately understood.


January 14-18, 2019
Reformed Pastoral Theology
Dr. Sinclair B. Ferguson
02DM862/01 – Orlando
SyllabusRegistration opens November 1

Throughout the centuries, from Calvin through the Puritans, Jonathan Edwards, and other theologians, reformed theology has characteristically been forged both for and often within the context of pastoral ministry. This course will focus on the work of gospel ministry governed by the three terms in the course title on the presupposition that the better a theologian a pastor is the greater his potential to be a better pastor and preacher. With that goal in view, the course will explore several biblical doctrines that have played a special role in the outworking of reformed theology in the context of pastoral ministry.


January 30, 2019 – July 15, 2019 – Online course (Prerequisite: Must have completed 7 courses)
Doctoral Project and Research Methodologies
Dr. S. Donald Fortson

03DM901 – Charlotte and Orlando
SyllabusRegistration opens November 1

This online course will assist the student to understand the required components of the DMin Project and to prepare an acceptable Project Proposal.  As an outcome of the course, students will write the first draft of a Project Proposal with bibliography and be prepared to submit this draft to the DMin committee on their home campus – Charlotte or Orlando.

 

 

Summer 2019

Charlotte

July 8 – 12, 2019
Pastoral Counseling
Dr. Jim Newheiser

03DM811 – Charlotte
Syllabus – Registration opens April 1

This course will focus upon honing skills in using God’s Word in pastoral soul care. This course will examine current trends in Christian counseling and will raise questions concerning the sufficiency of scripture in counseling, the proper use of common grace insights in counseling and when outside intervention is appropriate. Frequently encountered counseling topics will be addressed and case studies will be discussed.


July 15 – 19, 2019
Preaching from the Pastoral Epistles
Dr. Bill Barcley

03DM887 – Charlotte
Syllabus – Registration opens April 1

The Pastoral Epistles are unique among the Pauline epistles in that they address two men who have been given pastoral oversight over particular churches.  While they address specific problems and specific circumstances, they are especially useful in identifying Paul’s priorities, not just for pastoral ministry, but also for the ministry of the church in general.  This course will focus on the interpretation of these three letters with an eye toward preaching them, as well as ensuring that the ministry of our churches today matches the biblical model of a faithful church.


July 30, 2019 – January 15, 2020 – Online course (Prerequisite: Must have completed 7 courses)
Doctoral Project and Research Methodologies
Dr. S. Donald Fortson

03DM901 – Charlotte and Orlando
SyllabusRegistration opens April 1

This online course will assist the student to understand the required components of the DMin Project and to prepare an acceptable Project Proposal.  As an outcome of the course, students will write the first draft of a Project Proposal with bibliography and be prepared to submit this draft to the DMin committee on their home campus – Charlotte or Orlando.

 

 

Orlando

July 15 – 19, 2019
Christian Spirituality
Tom Schwanda

02DM843/01 – Orlando
Syllabus – Registration opens April 1

This course provides an overview to the history of the major leaders and movements of Christian spirituality. Beginning with the early church we will examine some of the primary writings that are representative of Roman Catholic, Orthodox and Protestant spirituality. Our concern will be how these earlier voices might speak to our contemporary church. Three questions will guide our reading and discussion: What spiritual disciplines did these earlier Christians use to cultivate their relationship with God? If this person was your spiritual guide how might they have mentored you or the people from your ministry? What insights and resources could be retrieved from these Christians to strengthen and encourage you and your ministry?


July 22-26, 2019
Preaching from the Psalms
Dr. Mark D. Futato

02DM874/01 – Orlando
Syllabus – Registration opens April 1

Preaching the Psalms is a course that combines hermeneutics and homiletics, as they apply in particular to the book of Psalms. This course combines theory and practice: You will not only study “how to,” you will also “do” what you are learning in the books. Preaching the Psalms is taught on the hybrid model. You will have extensive work to do before the week of class – more than in a traditional DMin class. This work will be online over the six weeks leading up to the week of class and will constitute about one third of class time. Because of this pre-class work, seat time in the classroom will be reduced.


July 30, 2019 – January 15, 2020 – Online course (Prerequisite: Must have completed 7 courses)
Doctoral Project and Research Methodologies
Dr. S. Donald Fortson

03DM901 – Charlotte and Orlando
SyllabusRegistration opens April 1

This online course will assist the student to understand the required components of the DMin Project and to prepare an acceptable Project Proposal.  As an outcome of the course, students will write the first draft of a Project Proposal with bibliography and be prepared to submit this draft to the DMin committee on their home campus – Charlotte or Orlando.