RAAN Launches New Look and More Content in 2014

RAAN—the Reformed African American Network (www.raanetwork.org) which was founded by two RTS Jackson students, Jemar Tisby and Phillip Homes—began 2014 by unveiling a website redesign that is accompanied by an increased frequency of publishing articles.  Their goal is to release a new post six days a week with an emphasis on meditation on Mondays and theology on Thursdays.  RAAN is getting into the podcast arena as well with their own podcast, “Pass the Mic.”  They are no strangers to video either, with their 2014 Promo video and an upcoming release of seven video interviews with John Piper.  A lot is happening in 2014 at RAAN.  

Since Tisby and Holmes launched RAAN in October 2012, they have posted 228 articles and gained over 3100 followers on Twitter and more than 4200 likes on Facebook.  The RAAN staff has grown from two to eight , including not only RTS Jackson students Tisby and Holmes, but RTS Jackson graduate Dennis Louis.  The RAAN board also is represented well by RTS Jackson, including Chancellor Ligon Duncan, Director of Admissions Brian Gault, and Guest Faculty Carl Ellis.  

Tisby and Holmes have written countless articles on a wide variety of topics, but RAAN relies on articles by regular contributors and guest contributors as well.  Two RTS students recently contributed blog posts to RAAN—Ian Hammond wrote Ignorance is Not Excused, and Cyril Chavis wrote Pridefully Reformed?  RTS Chancellor, Ligon Duncan, wrote one of the most popular posts of 2013 entitled, The Holy Hip Hop Hullabaloo.  The most popular article of 2013, however, was written by Jemar Tisby, President and Co-Founder of RAAN, entitled Cheerios, the Church, and Diversity.

The mission of the Reformed African American Network is to fuel modern reformation in the African American community and with a global mindset by addressing the core concerns of African Americans biblically, by connecting Christians who adhere to Reformed doctrines–especially African Americans, and by building theology in community from a Reformed and African American perspective as well as with others from diverse ethnic backgrounds.

 
Tom Von Stroh

Contact Jackson